Smart college marketers recruit adult students

Posted on May 7, 2018

The Adult Prospect Survey, a report released in February 2018 by Eduventures, provides some interesting insights into the adult student demographic.  Institutions that are trying to build enrollment should pay attention to Eduventures’ findings.

For many colleges and universities, the adult market is an alien landscape; it shouldn’t be, as adults when enrolled, tend to finish their courses and continue their programs.

Adults’ motivations are drastically different from those of eighteen-year-old freshmen, half of whom go to college for “the experience” according to a 2013 survey.  Adults have little interest in the social aspects of college. Adults are serious students. According to the Adult Prospect Survey, they are looking for one – or more – of four things: personal fulfillment, career advancement, and either immersion or convenience.  The choice between immersion or convenience is usually determined by the speed by which a degree can be earned, usually for career advancement. Convenience, on the other hand, is important to those who have full days with work and family. And adults, interestingly, in most cases don’t distinguish if a course is provided online or in a classroom setting, although our own experience with recruiting adult students leaned heavily to online programs.

If you’ve been paying attention over the past two or three years to the increase in the number of adults attending college – and the decrease in traditional “teen” enrollees – you may have wondered how you might tap into this lucrative market. We wondered the same thing and two years ago began developing a service that would benefit both prospective adult students and the institutions that want to serve them.

At our organizations, WhatsBestforMe.com and CollegeLeadExchange.com, we have targeted adult learners as we understand their motivations. We do not represent specific colleges or universities but instead allow schools access to our systems to select prospective enrollees based on a school’s specific criteria. Files in our database each contain detailed information on prospective students of all ages although much of our own marketing is directed at adult learners.

Ideally, an admissions department should look for prospective enrollees each of which have a certain predetermined profile. So a college that is interested in recruiting students who, for example, are between 24-37, have some college, want an online part-time degree program, and are interested in enrolling within three months, can plug that criteria in at CollegeLeadExchange and see how many files meet most of these requirements. The criteria, of course, is determined by the college. This easy and inexpensive – there is no obligation to buy – online service is not available today (May 1, 2018) but will be available by mid-summer.

Don’t ignore the adult student. They are serious “buyers” of education – and training – and once enrolled will usually solve any retention problem you have with those 20-year-olds.

College admissions departments use psychology – and dollars – to lure enrollees.

Posted on April 20, 2018

 

In 2004, when I first became involved in the business of higher education – I had been an entrepreneur for the previous thirty years – I was a bit shocked to learn that colleges discounted their tuition for a large percentage of students. But college admissions executives only used the word “discount” when talking among themselves; when speaking to the public they substituted “scholarship” for “discount.”
Why do they do this, I wondered? The “why” became obvious after I had been involved in higher education for a while, including six years as CEO of a university. When I passed on what I had learned to friends and relatives they either didn’t believe me or thought I was belittling their childrens’ or grandchildrens’ wonderful achievements in securing scholarships to college. So I said little while being frustrated at what I perceived as closed-mindedness, which was probably better defined as “don’t give me any information, factual or not, that will in any way diminish my pride.” It is all about pride, and college admissions people use it to their advantage.
On Wednesday, April 18, 2018, The Wall Street Journal published an article by Melissa Korn titled Prizes for All: Colleges Use Scholarships to Lure Students (URL below). Seems like Melissa discovered what I had discovered years ago and wrote about it in a prominent publication (not Fake News). Here, in her words, is the essence of the article:
Hundreds of colleges and universities are using academic scholarships and other merit-based financial aid to gain an edge in a battle for students. The scholarships make students feel wanted and let families think they’re getting a good deal, like a shopper who buys an expensive sweater on sale.
Ms. Korn goes on to describe how tuition discount rates for full-time new students at private colleges averaged 49% in 2017. I can imagine all the moms and dads who crowed about the huge scholarships their sons and daughters were awarded last year. There’s no harm in feeling good, and I guess it’s a bit like all the kids in kindergarten coming home with a gold star. Everyone’s happy – the kid, the parents, and in this case, especially the college.
The wide availability of discounts – call them scholarships if it makes you feel better – and the lack of awareness of their availability, is one of the reasons my organization created WhatsBestforMe.com. This new website allows prospective college students of all ages to state what they want in a school and what they’d like in the way of scholarships, grants or financial aid. Then schools who are looking for that type of students offered admission as well as tuition discounts (0ops. I mean scholarships).

Melissa Kern’s article can be found at https://tinyurl.com/y825mjzp.